David Walker (SAS)

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Person.png David Walker (SAS) Companies House PowerbaseRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(Soldier)
BornApril 1942
NationalityUK
Alma materGonville and Caius College (Cambridge)
ChildrenDaniel Henry Davison Walker
SpouseMary Walker
Founder ofControl Risks, Keenie Meenie Services, Saladin Security Ltd
Ex-SAS founder of Keenie Meenie Services

Not to be confused with the US David Walker.

David John Walker is a former SAS officer who in the 1970s began to run his own private military contractors, staffing his first company, Keenie Meenie Services, with SAS colleagues. This was reportedly protected by UK deep state operatives in 1976 against Harold Wilson's efforts to outlaw mercenary groups.[1]

Career

In February 1965 David Walker joined the Royal Engineers, from which he was seconded into 22 SAS.[2] He founded Control Risks[3] and is a specialist in South America.[4]

Activities

Keenie Meenie Services

Full article: Keenie Meenie Services

David Walker founded Keenie Meenie Services (KMS) in 1974. This was staffed by his SAS colleagues and known as 24 SAS. The name is an acronym of Arabic slang for "under the counter" and their motto is a pun of the old SAS motto; "who pays wins". KMS is said to be one of the world's largest recruitment agencies for mercenaries.[citation needed]

"Iran-Contra"

Full article: Iran Contra

Oliver North used Walker as part of the contra operation, Richard Secord hired him to fly missions into Nicaragua and sabotage Soviet helicopters.

Saladin Security Ltd

Full article: Saladin Security Ltd

In 1978 Walked founded Saladin Security Ltd.

UK Deep state support

KMS also helped Ian Smith in Rhodesia, Sri Lanka and assassination operations in the Lebanon. Herman & O'Sullivan say this is all done with close co-operation with the FCO and MI6: "all the work Walker gets from the Saudis comes through the British Foreign Office".[5] In the US Walker's people receive diplomatic immunity and carry State Dept. ID.

Exposure

Walked was publicly embarrassed by the exposure of the "Iran-Contra" connection. After a World In Action episode about KMS, a 1988 article in The Scotsman referred to the "notoriety which now surrounds his name".[2] Phil Miller wrote Keenie Meenie: The British Mercenaries Who Got Away with War Crimes about the collaboration between the UK Deep state and KMS Ltd.[1]



References