Philanthropy

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Concept.png Philanthropy 
(Activity,  PR term)Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
New Effort Seeks to Get 500 Wealthy Americans to Give.jpg
Interest of• Jessica Mauboy
• Obama Foundation
• Sainsbury family
• The Good Club
Formerly a neutral term, now absorbed by PR agencies to white or green wash criminal activity.

Philanthropy in the classical sense means support by a donor for a good cause. For people with very big fortunes the work is mostly done through foundations.

Official narrative

Philanthropy is carried out by billionaires for the "greater good" ("private initiatives, for the public good, focusing on quality of life").

Etymology

A philanthrope is a person who supports artists, fine arts (sometimes as collector) and more recently, any other cause that may be considered beneficial to society.

Criticism

The term implies - by definition - altruistic motives. It is often used for impression management by psychopaths and PR companies.


 

Examples

Page nameDescription
Susan BerresfordPresident of the Ford Foundation
Charity
William Chasey
Ford Foundation/President
Lev LevievIsraeli billionaire supporter of the Hasidic movement
Joseph Pulitzer

 

Related Quotations

PageQuoteAuthorDate
Susan Berresford“The program we designed [the Ford Foundation International Fellowship Program], which we're funding to the tune of $300 million — the largest single grant in the history of the foundation — is just wrapping up its first year. Over the next ten years, it will support about thirty-five hundered people around the world for up to three years of graduate study. And we hope they will not only take advantage of this opportunity — paid in full, anywhere in the world — but that they will return to their home countries and begin to function effectively as leaders. Eventually, we think that out of this group will emerge some extraordinary world leaders — at least we hope so. We do need to be thinking consciously about where the next generation of world leaders is going to come from.”Susan Berresford28 May 2002
Andrew CarnegieAndrew Carnegie was regarded in his day not just as a robber baron but--after the Homestead Strike of 1892, in which hired guards killed seven striking steelworkers--as a plutocrat with blood on his hands. He reshaped his image by giving away most of his fortune during his lifetime, and today he is remembered less for the strike than for his phrase 'the man who dies...rich dies disgraced.'”Andrew Carnegie
Andy Serwer
Jeanne Lee
Malaria“The growing dominance of malaria research by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation risks stifling a diversity of views among scientists and wiping out the health agency’s policy-making function”Arata Kochi2008


References