The Lancet

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Publication.png The Lancet  FacebookRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Typejournal
Founder(s)Thomas Wakley
Author(s)Unknown
Local copyBroken Link: [[{{{local}}}]]
Top medical journal which in 2020 was used to promote the COVID-19 Official narrative.

The Lancet is a medical journal, which prior to 2020 was highly reputed. In Autumn 2020 its March statement terming proponents of the non-natural origin of Sars-Cov2 as "conspiracy theorists" was revealed to have been prepared by Peter Daszak, a funder of gain of function research on bat coronaviruses. In 2020, The Lancet also published a faked paper which claimed that hydroxychloroquine was ineffective and dangerous when used to treat Covid-19.

COVID-19

In September The Lancet made Peter Daszak the lead investigator of its "inquiry" into the origins of the pandemic.[1]

We stand together to strongly condemn conspiracy theories suggesting that COVID-19 does not have a natural origin

In March 2020, The Lancet published a statement by Peter Daszak, co-authored by 26 others[2] which noted that "The rapid, open, and transparent sharing of data on this outbreak is now being threatened by rumours and misinformation around its origins. We stand together to strongly condemn conspiracy theories suggesting that COVID-19 does not have a natural origin."[3] Although the original author was not mentioned, by November 2020 emails had emerged onto the internet that revealed that Daszak had written it an solicited the 26 co-signers.[4]

Hydroxychloroquine hit piece

In May 2020 The Lancet published a paper on the dangers of Hydroxychloroquine. This was later withdrawn.[5]

Telegraph investigation

In September 2021, an investigation from The Telegraph revealed that 26 out of 27 Lancet scientists have links to the Wuhan Institute of Virology.[6]

Water fluoridation

Full article: Water/Fluoridation

In 2014, The Lancet published a paper which mentioned that "A meta-analysis of 27 cross-sectional studies of children exposed to fluoride in drinking water, mainly from China, suggests an average IQ decrement of about seven points in children exposed to raised fluoride concentrations."[7].


 

Related Quotation

PageQuoteAuthorDate
Big pharma“Much of the scientific literature, perhaps half, may simply be untrue. Afflicted by studies with small sample sizes, tiny effects, invalid exploratory analyses, and flagrant conflicts of interest, together with an obsession for pursuing fashionable trends of dubious importance, science has taken a turn towards darkness.”Richard Horton2015


References