Virus

From Wikispooks
(Redirected from Viruses)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Not to be confused with a computer virus.

Concept.png Virus Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Interest of• Christian Drosten
• EcoHealth Alliance
• Anthony Fauci
• George Gao
• Peter Openshaw
• Wuhan Institute of Virology

A virus is a submicroscopic infectious agent that replicates only inside the living cells of an organism. Viruses infect all types of life forms, from animals to plants and microorganisms. Viruses are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth and are the most numerous type of biological entity.

Problems with narrative

The science is not as straightforward as it seems at first glance.

The standard method for isolation of viruses involves processing a sample onto tissue culture containing usually four to six other types of material — all of which contain identical genetic material as to what is called a “virus.” This brew is then subjected to genetic analysis, which then creates in a computer-simulation process the alleged sequence of the alleged virus, a so called in silico genome. At no time is an actual virus confirmed by electron microscopy. At no time is a genome extracted and sequenced from an actual virus.[1]

Showing that a virus is causally related to a disease is also problematic.

Thomas Cowan[2] talks about virus isolation - video title: "Year End Review and Thoughts on the Future" Jan 12, 2021[3]

Isolation

Dr. Andrew Kaufman describes the proper way to isolate, characterize and demonstrate a new virus[1]:


First, one takes samples (blood, sputum, secretions) from many people (e.g. 500) with symptoms which are unique and specific enough to characterize an illness. Without mixing these samples with ANY tissue or products that also contain genetic material, the virologist macerates, filters and ultracentrifuges i.e. purifies the specimen. This common virology technique, done for decades to isolate bacteriophages[4] and so-called giant viruses in every virology lab, then allows the virologist to demonstrate with electron microscopy thousands of identically sized and shaped particles. These particles are the isolated and purified virus.

These identical particles are then checked for uniformity by physical and/or microscopic techniques. Once the purity is determined, the particles may be further characterized. This would include examining the structure, morphology, and chemical composition of the particles. Next, their genetic makeup is characterized by extracting the genetic material directly from the purified particles and using genetic-sequencing techniques, such as Sanger sequencing, that have also been around for decades. Then one does an analysis to confirm that these uniform particles are exogenous (outside) in origin as a virus is conceptualized to be, and not the normal breakdown products of dead and dying tissues.[5] (As of May 2020, we know that virologists have no way to determine whether the particles they’re seeing are viruses or just normal break-down products of dead and dying tissues.)[6]

If we have come this far then we have fully isolated, characterized, and genetically sequenced an exogenous virus particle. However, we still have to show it is causally related to a disease. This is carried out by exposing a group of healthy subjects (animals are usually used) to this isolated, purified virus in the manner in which the disease is thought to be transmitted. If the animals get sick with the same disease, as confirmed by clinical and autopsy findings, one has now shown that the virus actually causes a disease. This demonstrates infectivity and transmission of an infectious agent.


 

Examples

Page nameDescription
Marburg virusA virus presented by corporate media in 2021 as the next big thing, despite only a handful of deaths since 2005. Super-deadly but apparently now with asymptomatic infection (i.e no symptoms) that can be detected with a PCR test. May be cover for vaccine injuries.
MonkeypoxA virus found in the 1950s in monkeys. The lurid exaggerations in the corporate media presentation of Monkeypox have many similarities to Covid-19. The symptoms are remarkably similar to one of the main side effects of Covid-19 jabs.
Respiratory syncytial virus
SARSA corona virus first that killed at least 774 people in 2003, and has since broken out of laboratories 6 times.
Swine flu (H1N1)A virus that was massively promoted as becoming a deadly pandemic for about 20 months on corporate media, from January 2009 to August 2010. Was declared a pandemic by WHO, with governments making big purchases for vaccines, only to throw them away, as the flu was deemed more damaging world wide.
Zika virusRare virus that was heavily hyped by special interests

 

Related Quotations

PageQuoteAuthorDate
Philip Mountbatten“I just wonder what it would be like to be reincarnated in an animal whose species had been so reduced in numbers than it was in danger of extinction. What would be its feelings toward the human species whose population explosion had denied it somewhere to exist… I must confess that I am tempted to ask for reincarnation as a particularly deadly virus.”Philip Mountbatten1987
Jon Rappoport“And that is preventing a hard look at...African nations where poverty and illness are staples of everyday life for the overwhelming number of people.

The command structure in those areas has a single dictum: don’t solve the human problem.

Don’t clean up the contaminated water supplies, don’t return stolen land to the people so they can thrive and grow food and finally achieve nutritional health, don’t solve overcrowding, don’t install basic sanitation, don’t strengthen immune systems, don’t let the people have power—because then they would throw off the local and global corporate juggernauts that are sucking the land of all its resources.

In order not to solve the problems of the people, a cover story is necessary. A cover story that exonerates the power structure.

A cover story like a virus.

It’s all about the virus. The demon. The strange attacker. Forget everything else. The virus is the single enemy.”
Jon Rappoport12 January 2022


References