Westminster paedophile dossier

From Wikispooks
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Publication.png Westminster paedophile dossier 
(propaganda)Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Typereport
Author(s)Geoffrey Dickens
SubjectsUK/VIPaedophile
A dossier of allegations on paedophilia by senior UK establishment figures

The Westminster paedophile dossier was a dossier of evidence about the VIPaedophile phenomenon in the UK. It was assembled by Geoffrey Dickens, who in 1984 handed it to Home Secretary, Leon Brittan, who then "lost" it. Other files on organised child abuse held by the Home Office also went missing.[1]

Origins

Between 1981 and 1985 Dickens campaigned against a suspected paedophile ring he claimed to have uncovered that was connected to trading child pornography.[2] In 1981, Dickens in the House of Commons accused Sir Peter Hayman, the former senior diplomat, civil servant and MI6 operative, of being a paedophile in the House of Commons, using parliamentary privilege. Dickens further questioned why Hayman had not been jailed after it was discovered he had left a package containing child pornography on a bus.[2]

In 1983, Dickens claimed there was a paedophile network involving "big, big names - people in positions of power, influence and responsibility" and threatened to name them in the Commons.[2] The next year, he campaigned for the banning of the pro-paedophile activism group of which Hayman was a member, the Paedophile Information Exchange.[2]

In 1984 Dickens presented the dossier he had compiled to the then Home Secretary, Leon Brittan, in 1984.

"Not been retained"

In 2013, the Home Office stated that all relevant information had been passed to the police, and that Dickens' dossier had "not been retained".[citation needed] It was later disclosed that 114 documents concerning child abuse allegations were missing.

"Investigation"

In July 2014, the Labour Party called for a new inquiry into the way that the allegations had been handled, and Prime Ministe David Cameron ordered the permanent secretary of the Home Office, Mark Sedwill, to investigate the circumstances of the lost dossier.

The Independent Panel Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse

On 7 July 2014, the Home Secretary, Theresa May announced a "review" into the handling of historic child abuse allegations, to be led by Peter Wanless (head of the NSPCC) and the establishment of a public panel inquiry into the duty of care taken in the protection of children from paedophiles by British public institutions, led by an independent panel of experts and chaired by Baroness Butler-Sloss.

Resignations

Fiona Woolf resigned from handling of historic child abuse allegations, as did her predecessor in the job, Elizabeth Butler-Sloss.

Butler-Sloss later stood down as chair of the inquiry.[3] On 5 September 2014, it was announced that it would instead be chaired by Fiona Woolf[4] but on 31 October 2014 she, too, resigned from the role.[5] On 4 February 2015 it was announced that the inquiry would be chaired by Justice Lowell Goddard, a New Zealand High Court judge. The existing panel would be disbanded, and the inquiry would be given new powers.[6]

See also

Additional recent details cited here:[7][8][9]



References

  1. Boffey, Daniel (6 July 2014). "Tebbit hints at political cover-up over child abuse in 1980s". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 6 July 2014.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").
  2. a b c d "Tory MP warned of powerful paedophile ring 30 years ago". The Independent. London. 22 February 2013. Retrieved 6 July 2014.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").
  3. "Butler-Sloss steps down from child abuse inquiry". BBC News. 14 July 2014. Retrieved 14 July 2014.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").
  4. "Lord Mayor Fiona Woolf to lead child abuse inquiry". BBC News. 5 September 2014. Retrieved 5 September 2014.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").
  5. "Fiona Woolf resigns as head of child abuse inquiry". BBC News. 31 October 2014. Retrieved 31 October 2014.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").
  6. "New Zealand judge Lowell Goddard to lead abuse inquiry". BBC News. 4 February 2015. Retrieved 4 February 2015.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").
  7. White, Michael (2015-03-17). "The Westminster child abuse 'coverup': how much did MPs know?". TheGuardian.com. The Guardian. Retrieved 2017-06-13.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").
  8. Whitehead, Tom (2014-07-06). "The alleged paedophile ring at the heart of the British Establishment". Telegraph.co.uk. The Telegraph. Retrieved 2017-06-13.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").
  9. Hines, Nico (2015-03-06). "How Thatcher's Government Covered Up a VIP Pedophile Ring". TheDailyBeast.com. The Daily Beast. Retrieved 2017-06-13.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "CSS").