White Supremacy

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Concept.png White Supremacy 
(racial prejudice)Rdf-icon.png
Interest of Ku Klux Klan

White Supremacy or white supremacism is the racist belief that white people are superior to people of other races and therefore should be dominant over them. White Supremacy has roots in scientific racism, and it often relies on pseudoscientific arguments. Like most similar movements such as neo-Nazism, white supremacists typically oppose members of other races as well as Jews.

The term is also typically used to describe a political ideology that perpetuates and maintains the social, political, historical, or institutional domination by white people (as evidenced by historical and contemporary sociopolitical structures such as the Atlantic slave trade, Jim Crow laws in the United States, and apartheid in South Africa).[1][2] Different forms of white supremacism put forth different conceptions of who is considered white, and different groups of white supremacists, such as the Ku Klux Klan, identify various racial and cultural groups as their primary enemy.[3]

 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:In Venezuela, White Supremacy Is a Key Driver of the CoupArticle7 February 2019Greg Palast
William Camacaro
Four centuries of White Supremacy in Venezuela by those who identify their ancestors as European came to an end with the 1998 election of Hugo Chávez, who won with the overwhelming support of the Mestizo majority. This turn away from White Supremacy continues under Nicolás Maduro, Chavez’s chosen successor, who was re-elected in 2018 for a second six-year term.


References

  1. Wildman, Stephanie M. (1996). Privilege Revealed: How Invisible Preference Undermines America. NYU Press. p. 87. ISBN 0-8147-9303-7.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. Helms, Janet (2016). "An election to save White Heterosexual Male Privilege". Latina/o Psychology Today. 3: 6–7.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  3. Flint, Colin (2004). Spaces of Hate: Geographies of Discrimination and Intolerance in the U.S.A. Routledge. p. 53. ISBN 0-415-93586-5. Although white racist activists must adopt a political identity of whiteness, the flimsy definition of whiteness in modern culture poses special challenges for them. In both mainstream and white supremacist discourse, to be white is to be distinct from those marked as non-white, yet the placement of the distinguishing line has varied significantly in different times and places.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
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