Stephen Schwartz

From Wikispooks
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Person.png Stephen Schwartz   Powerbase SourcewatchRdf-icon.png
(journalist, author)
Stephen Suleyman Schwartz.jpg
Born1948/09/09
Columbus, Ohio, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
ReligionSufi Muslim
Founder ofCenter for Islamic Pluralism
An American journalist, author and associate of Daniel Pipes

Stephen Schwartz is a close associate of Daniel Pipes with whom he founded the think tank, Center for Islamic Pluralism (CIP).[1] The Center for Islamic Pluralism describes itself as "a think tank that challenges the dominance of American Muslim life by militant Islamist groups." It says its mission is to

Educate the broader American public about the reality of moderate Islam and the threat to moderate Muslims and non-Muslim Americans represented by militant, political, radical, and adversarial tendencies.[2]

In December 2004 he was touring the US with Husain Haqqani, a neoconservative-connected Pakistani, in support of a think tank by the name of Institute for Islamic Progress and Peace (IIPP).[3] It is not clear, however, whether CIP and IIPP, both set up by Daniel Pipes, are one and the same.

A brief biographical note on the National Review Online website describes him as "a vociferous critic of Wahhabism". Schwartz describes Wahhabism as "an extremist, puritanical, and violent movement that emerged, with the pretension of 'reforming' Islam, in the central area of Arabia in the 18th century."[4] Schwartz is a frequent contributor to the National Review, the Weekly Standard, FrontPage, and other conservative publications.

On 6 June 2003, Schwartz, in his role as senior policy analyst with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracy, participated in a FrontPage Symposium on "Saudi Arabia: Friend or Foe?"[5]

Affiliations

Published Works

  • Stephen Schwartz, The Two Faces of Islam: The House of Sa'ud from Tradition to Terror, Doubleday, October 2002. ISBN 0385506929

External Links

Articles

References

  1. Home page, Center for Islamic Pluralism website, accessed 3 September 2009
  2. Center for Islamic Pluralism CIP Washington, DC, IntoIslam website, accessed 3 September 2009
  3. Muslim majority is tired of extremists, Cleveland Jewish News, February 12, 2004, accessed 3 Sept 2009
  4. The Good & the Bad, National Review Online, 18 Nov 2002, accessed 3 Sept 2009
  5. Jamie Glazov,Saudi Arabia: Friend or Foe?, FrontPage magazine, 9 Sept 2002, accessed 3 Sept 2009
  6. Stephen Schwartz, Jamestown Foundation website, accessed 3 Sept 2009
  7. Stephen Schwartz, Hardliners in Costume as Moderate Muslims, Family Security Matters, Jan 2 2002, accessed 3 Sept 2009