Bruce Anderson

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Person.png Bruce Anderson  Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(journalist, editor, deep state actor)
Bruce Anderson.jpg
Born1949
Orkney Islands
NationalityUK
Member ofLe Cercle
UK pro-torture spooky journalist, Le Cercle, attended a "terrorism" related conference chaired by Harold Elletson in 2009.

Bruce Anderson is a UK political columnist, who as of 2015 was working as a freelancer. Formerly he was a political editor at The Spectator and as of 2015 he was still writing for them.[1] Anderson has written for the Daily Mail, and wrote for the The Independent newspaper from 2003 to September 2010, and ConservativeHome until 2012.

Activities

Francis Elliot and James Hanning state that it may have been Anderson who recommended the young David Cameron to UK Prime Minister John Major as part of his question time team in the early 1990s.[2]

Opinions

Bruce Anderson argued against extending the right to


Advocacy of torture

Bruce Anderson has been an advocate of torture in ticking time bomb scenarios, even before 9-11 brought the question to greater public prominence. In February 2010 he wrote a column for The Independent, arguing that the British government would have not just the right, but the duty, to torture if there was a ticking bomb, and that they should torture children if they believed that doing so would yield information that would avert a terrorist attack:

It came, in the form of a devilish intellectual challenge. "Let's take your hypothesis a bit further. We have captured a terrorist, but he is a hardened character. We cannot be certain that he will crack in time. We have also captured his wife and children". After much agonising, I have come to the conclusion that there is only one answer to Sydney's question. Torture the wife and children.[3]

Deep Political connections

He attended Le Cercle.

 

Event Participated in

EventStartEndLocation(s)
Security and Defence Learning/20092 December 20092 December 2009Berlin
Hotel InterContinental


References