Daphne Caruana Galizia

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Person.png Daphne Caruana Galizia   Twitter WebsiteRdf-icon.png
(journalist, blogger)
Daphne Caruana Galizia.jpg
BornDaphne Anne Vella
1964-08-26
Sliema, Malta
Died16 October 2017 (Age 53)
near Bidnija, Mosta, Malta
Cause of death
car bomb
ResidenceMalta
NationalityMaltese
Alma materUniversity of Malta
Children3
SpousePeter Caruana Galizia
ExposedPanama Papers
Victim ofassassination
Interests • Panama Papers
• corruption
• golden passports
The Maltese journalist and blogger who exposed the Panama Papers. Assassinated in 2017 by a car bomb

Daphne Caruana Galizia was a Maltese journalist and blogger who exposed the Panama Papers.[1]

Career

Caruana Galizia's posts often attracted more readers than the combined circulation of her country’s newspapers. She was described shortly before her assassination by Politico as a “one-woman WikiLeaks”. The Guardian described her blogs as "a thorn in the side of both the establishment and underworld figures."[2]

Before she was killed, Daphne Caruana Galizia was investigating Malta's citizenship for sale system, referred to as "Golden Passports".[3]

Assassination

On 1 October 2017, Caruana Galizia filed a police report to say that she had been receiving death threats.

She was killed when a bomb exploded in her car, breaking the vehicle into several pieces and throwing debris into a nearby field. [2]

In December 2018, the Council of Europe's advisory body on constitutional matters, the Venice Commission, called for a public inquiry into the assassination.

Legacy

After her assassination, Forbidden Stories set up The Daphne Project, which the Organised Crime and Corruption Reporting Project described as "a group of 45 journalists representing 18 news organisations from 15 countries picked up Daphne’s work after it was abruptly halted by her gruesome death on the doorstep of Europe."[4]


In 2019 her sons, Matthew, Andrew and Paul Caruana Galizia called for concrete action ahead of Global Media Freedom Conference.[5]

26 August 1964|16 October 2017|


References