Frank Archibald

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Person.png Frank Archibald LinkedInRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(spook)
Frank Archibald.jpg
BornJuly 31, 1955
Charleston, South Carolina
DiedMarch 13, 2020 (Age 64)
NationalityUS
Alma materClemson University, National War College
Member ofAssociation of Former Intelligence Officers

Francis X. Archibald was a former director of the CIA's National Clandestine Service.[1]

Career

Archibald enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1974 and served with distinction as an Infantryman and leader earning the rank of Sergeant. After leaving the Marine Corps, he graduated from Clemson University in 1983, where he was a Captain of the rugby team. He remained an ardent, lifetime supporter and fan of Clemson and its football team in particular.[2]

He then joined the CIA and began an extraordinary national security career. Over 31 years with the CIA, Archibald served in Latin America, Africa, the Balkans, Southeast and Southwest Asia. Frank held senior assignments at CIA Headquarters in Counterterrorism and Counterintelligence, and was Chief of the Latin American Division. He was a Distinguished Graduate of the National War College in 2001. The capstone of Frank's career was being selected the Director of the National Clandestine Service, an assignment leading all of CIA's operations worldwide. [2]

During his CIA career, he received the CIA's highest award, the Distinguished Intelligence Cross for heroism, as well as numerous other CIA awards.He retired from the CIA in 2015, and subsequently became a senior advisor for the Crumpton Group, an international consulting firm that provides clients with intelligence-driven solutions. He also served on the Board of Directors for the OSS Society.[2]

Exposure

Archibald was outed in a Twitter post in 2013, and details of his biography were known to some journalists. He was 57 when he took the job that year, and it also became known he served tours in Pakistan and Africa and also headed the CIA’s Latin America division.[3]


References