"US/National security"

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Concept.png "US/National security" Rdf-icon.png
Us national security.jpg
Typelegal,  fraud
A legal loophole controlled by the Cabal.

"National security" is widely used in the US by the deep state for a range of purposes. It has been used by the CIA to arm terrorist groups[1] and by the FBI to avoid explain why they turned a blind eye (or worse) to the Dallas occupy plot to assassinate leaders of the peaceful protests.

Legal 'Get Out Of Jail Free'

"National security" is codified into ever more laws as a kind of legal "Get Out Of Jail Free" card - i.e. a sovereign immunity, a way to avoid being prosecuted under the law to which only national governments have resort. In 2009, US Attorney General Eric Holder explicitly stated that lawyers would only invoke the privilege when there was a possibility of "significant harm" to the USA, and that they would not use it to hide to hide "administrative error", to "prevent embarrassment" or hide illegal government programs.[2] This is an ever more blatant lie. The US government cited national security to withhold information a record 8,496 times — a 57 percent increase over a year earlier and more than double Obama’s first year".[3]

Withholding information

Many nations have some official form of 'State Secrets Privilege', a legal doctrine allowing the government to withhold information during legal proceedings which they would otherwise have to disclose (such as, for example, the source of information, or answers to questions from the defence). This is intended to be used only for (scarce) matters of "National Security". It is (often explicitly) not to be used to cover wrongdoing, although ever more blatantly — in USA particularly — it is being used to do exactly that. In 2009, US Attorney General Eric Holder explicitly stated that lawyers would only invoke the privilege when there was a possibility of "significant harm" to the country, and that they would not use it to hide to hide "administrative error", to "prevent embarrassment" or hide illegal government programs.[4]

In 2016, the NSA claimed that 90-year-old information on early American cryptanalytic efforts against Russia and the Soviet Union from a 20-year-old document must not be disclosed on the grounds that releasing the information could "reasonably be expected to cause identifiable or describable damage to national security."[5]


Dismissing lawsuits

Full article: Stub class article Khalid El-Masri

Khalid El-Masri was kidnapped by the CIA, then interrogated and tortured for months. US Judge Thomas Selby Ellis dismissed his lawsuit on grounds of "national security".[6]

Arming terrorists

In the USA, the Arms Export Control Act "prohibit[s] sending weaponry to countries... [if] that country has repeatedly provided support for acts of international "terrorism"," however, the president is allowed "to waive those prohibitions if he “determines that the transaction is essential to the national security interests of the United States.”" This clause was used by Barack Obama in 2013 to send arms to Syrian rebels linked to Al Qaeda. [7]

Suppressing technology

Full article: Stub class article Invention Secrecy Act

Passed in 1951, The Invention Secrecy Act has suppressed thousands of patents which the US federal authorities considered would threaten the "national security" of the US.

Vaccines

The Age-Old Struggle against the Antivaccinationists, an article published in 2011 in the New England Journal of Medicine used national security in a novel context, stating that "antivaccinationist" activities resulted in a high cost to society, "including damage to individual and community well-being from outbreaks of previously controlled diseases, withdrawal of vaccine manufacturers from the market, compromising of national security (in the case of anthrax and smallpox vaccines), and lost productivity".[8]

Rahinah Ibrahim case

In February 2014 Rahinah Ibrahim became the first person ever to successfully get themselves removed from a US government no fly list, after a decade of legal battles in which lawyers give millions of dollars of legal help. The ruling was made after a five-day, non-jury trial conducted largely behind closed doors. The US Justice Department was unavailable for comment.[9]

“At long last, the government has conceded that plaintiff poses no threat to air safety or national security and should never have been placed on the no-fly list. She got there by human error within the FBI. This too is conceded. This was no minor human error but an error with palpable impact, leading to the humiliation, cuffing, and incarceration of an innocent and incapacitated air traveler. That it was human error may seem hard to accept — the FBI agent filled out the nomination form in a way exactly opposite from the instructions on the form, a bureaucratic analogy to a surgeon amputating the wrong digit — human error, yes, but of considerable consequence.”
Judge Alsup [10]
Official ruling


References