Enrique Peña Nieto

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Person.png Enrique Peña Nieto  Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(politician)
Enrique Pena Nieto.jpg
Born20 July 1966
NationalityMexican
Spouse • Mónica Pretelini
• Angélica Rivera
Member ofWEF/Young Global Leaders/2007
PartyInstitutional Revolutionary Party
As Mexican President he ran a remarkably corrupt government. At the time, foreign corporate media preferred to turn a blind eye to it.

Employment.png President of Mexico

In office
December 2012 - 30 November 2018
Preceded byFelipe Calderón
Succeeded byAndres Manuel Lopez Obrador

Enrique Peña Nieto, commonly referred to by his initials EPN, is a Mexican politician. He was the 64th President of Mexico from 1 December 2012, to 30 November 2018. A member of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, he previously served as Governor of the State of Mexico from 2005 to 2011. He was selected a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2007.

Peña Nieto ran a remarkably corrupt government[1]. At the time, the international media preferred to turn a blind eye to it, choosing instead to brand Peña Nieto’s early years as "the Mexican moment".[2]

Corruption

In 2012, Peña Nieto “won” the Mexican presidency with a campaign that was a masterpiece of transactional corruption. With some four billion pesos in donations ($300 million at the then exchange rate), an amount exceeding legal spending limits some thirteen times over, the campaign used its bonanza to purchase votes through the distribution of prepaid debit cards.

In August 2020, prosecutors in Mexico opened a corruption investigation against him. It comes after Emilio Lozoya, the ex-head of the state energy firm Pemex, accused him of taking millions of dollars in bribes and bribing MPs.[3]

Monitored by the NSA

Documents from Edward Snowden showed that in June 2012, the US NSA targeted the texts between Enrique Peña Nieto and nine of his closest associates in the weeks leading up to the election on July 1. Der Spiegel wrote[4]:

"The NSA’s intelligence agents in Texas must have been asking themselves such questions when they authorized an unusual type of operation known as structural surveillance. For two weeks in the early summer of 2012, the NSA unit responsible for monitoring the Mexican government analyzed data that included the cell phone communications of Peña Nieto and “nine of his close associates,” as an internal presentation from June 2012 shows. Analysts used software to connect this data into a network, shown in a graphic that resembles a swarm of bees. The software then filtered out Peña Nieto’s most relevant contacts and entered them into a databank called “DishFire.” From then on, these individuals’ cell phones were singled out for surveillance.

According to the internal documents, this led to the agency intercepting 85,489 text messages, some sent by Peña Nieto himself and some by his associates. This technology “might find a needle in a haystack,” the analysts noted, adding that it could do so “in a repeatable and efficient way.”

Spying for the CIA

The government of Peña Nieto spied on diplomats from China, Russia, Iran and North Korea in accordance with a pact with the CIA.[5]

A classified document, released by the Mexican magazine Proceso, reproduced part of a report by Eugenio Ímaz, former director of the Center for Research and National Security (CISEN), presented in Washington on April 15 and 16, 2013. The document reported on the advances in international espionage carried out in coordination with the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

The documents show the presence of the CIA on Mexican territory, as a result of the creation of CISEN, also during the six-year term of the former president of Mexico, Felipe Calderón (2006-2012).

Personal

His first wife, Mónica Pretelini, passed away on 11 January 2007, under mysterious circumstances. Enrique has confirmed that he was having affairs during his marital relationship with Monica. [6]

On the day of her death, the announcements were all over the place. First, the governor's own spokesperson announced that she had died from an overdose of anti-depressants (other reports said sleeping pills), then that she was brain dead, then finally, the doctor who had been treating her for two years made an announcement that she had been having [epileptic] seizures and that she had suffered, this time, from a fatal one, which caused cardiac arrhythmia and in turn respiratory arrest, from which she died.[7]

On May 12, 2007, Peña Nieto's deceased wife's bodyguards were murdered while accompanying Peña Nieto's three children, their maternal grandparents and aunt in Veracruz. Only the truck of the bodyguards was targeted; the family was unhurt.



References