"Weapon of mass destruction"

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Concept.png "Weapon of mass destruction" 
(weaponNamebase SourcewatchRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
WMD.png
Typetechnology,  propaganda
Interest of• Wouter Basson
• Amy Baker Benjamin
• Ian Butterfield
• Combating Terrorism Center
• Dale E. Klein
• Herbert Levine
• National Counterproliferation Center
• Nuclear Threat Initiative

A "weapon of mass destruction" can potentially kill millions of people and destroy a lot of infrastructure. At the same time, the phrase "weapon of mass destruction" has been used for propaganda to promote fear and invoke enemy images; exemplified by the media reporting in the run up the the 2003 Iraq war, when it turned out there were none.

Official Narrative

Wikipedia states that "a weapon of mass destruction (WMD or WoMD) is a nuclear, radiological, biological, chemical or other weapon that can kill and bring significant harm to a large number of humans or cause great damage to human-made structures (e.g. buildings), natural structures (e.g. mountains), or the biosphere". It goes along the lines of the Department of Homeland Security definition.[1] Wikipedia also notes that: "The scope and usage of the term has evolved and been disputed, often signifying more politically than technically."

Etymology

Originally coined in reference to aerial bombing with chemical explosives during World War II, it has later come to refer to large-scale weaponry of other technologies, such as chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear warfare.

Problems with the terminology

Nuclear, chemical and biological weapons can justifiably be called "weapons of mass destruction" and are self-evident so, but depending on the definition in use, the term can also used for weapons of lesser capacity, ie small scale explosive devices.[2]

United States

US law is so broad that a "weapon of mass destruction" may be anything that explodes, leading political scientist and "terrorism"-fear skeptic John Mueller to comment that "As I understand it, not only is a grenade a weapon of mass destruction, but so is a maliciously-designed child's rocket even if it doesn't have a warhead."[3]


 

Examples

Page nameDescription
Biological weapon
Chemical weapon
Drone
Explosive
Nuclear weapon

 

Related Documents

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:A Conundrum for Corbynarticle12 July 2016Conrad SumerTrident could be Corbyn's much more collegiate equivalent of Blair’s “Clause 4” moment, instead of facing off and bullying his party, he could bring them all together under the banner of nuclear reduction - and if he gets it right, he will almost certainly be the next Prime Minister.
Document:War and Peace - The Lost Principles of Science and Valuearticle17 June 2015John McMurtryA wide-ranging critique of the techniques of globalisation and the way in which apparently otherwise well-meaning western NGOs frame the worlds problems in US war propaganda terms
File:A Global Chronology of Incidents of Chemical, Biological, Radioactive and Nuclear Attacks 1950-2005.pdfreport7 July 2006Hamid Mohtadi
Antu Murshid
A summary of Chemical, Biological, Radioactive and Nuclear Attacks, from 1950 - 2005, giving the number of injuries and fatalities, and other information (if known) on the perpetrators and motives.
File:Israel and CB Weapons.pdfreviewOctober 2001Avner Cohen

 

An official example

Name
Grenade


References