David Grimes

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Person.png David Grimes   Twitter WebsiteRdf-icon.png
(physicist, journalist)
David Grimes.jpg
Born1985
Interests • “Conspiracy Theories”
• Cancer
• Water Fluoridation
• Climate change
• Mainstream media
• Electromagnetic radiation

David Robert Grimes is a physicist and post-doctoral cancer researcher at the University of Oxford .[1] He also writes for the mainstream media in publications such as The Irish Times and The Guardian.[2] [3] He has written articles on water fluoridation, climate change, and cancer cures, and casting doubt on the medical power of cannabis. He is a major pusher of the safe vaccine narrative. In 2016 he published a paper on "conspiracy theories" which was widely reported by the commercially-controlled media, leading to speculation that he might be part of an organised effort to try to equate dissent with mental illness.[4]

Mainstream media 'debunker'"

Grimes has a reputation for 'debunking' in commercially controlled media, writing for many outlets and appearing on BBC radio and television in particular. His work is prolific, and he repeats the status quo on topics such as Water/Fluoridation, dismissing alternative evidence of toxicity and parroting the CDC and WHO lines[5][6]. He supports the conventional view[7] on climate-change, calling skeptics 'denialists'[8]. He has also repeatedly dismissed suggestions that cannabis can help with cancer or other illnesses[9], echoing the standard Big Pharma line. He also claims alternative cancer cures have no merit[10], and was awarded for his work on fluoride by Sense About Science[11].

Vaccine pusher

Grimes is a known vaccine agent[12][13], and has suppressed the work of Dr. Andrew Wakefield in national media, protesting the screening of his documentary and labeling him a '..long-debunked fear merchant whose attempt to paint himself as a Galileo-like figure is at once completely narcissistic and utterly dishonest'.[14].

Dismissing Wi-Fi health risks

He dismisses concerns about Wi-Fi and cellphone electromagnetic frequency in the mainstream media[15]. Predictably, he also attacked claims a conspiracy might be at play[16]. He also published an academic paper, suppressed another paper which claimed Wi-Fi was causing cancer and autism[17] .

Government advisor

Grimes has been known to secretly advise governments and his exactly influence is unclear. He has been active in trying to criminalize people providing alternative cancer treatments in Ireland[18].

Paper on "Conspiracy Theories"

In 2016 David Grimes published a simplistic statistical model of conspiracies which he proposed "might be useful in counteracting the potentially deleterious consequences of bogus and anti-science narratives".[19] This was given what one commentator referred to as "massive [corporate] media coverage"[1], including the BBC.[20] He assumed that each conspirator was equally well informed about the conspiracy, and that each was equally likely to "expose" it, which would result in its instant "failure". He calibrated this model using three exposed conspiracies (or collusions), with no explanation of why he had chosen these three:

  1. The NSA/PRISM programme "exposed by" Edward Snowden;
  2. The Tuskegee syphilis experiment "exposed by" Peter Buxtun; and,
  3. The FBI Laboratory "exposed by" Dr Frederic Whitehurst.

Equal information

Grimes' assumption that everyone in a conspiracy is equally well informed about it flies in the face of the hierarchical nature of organisations and what is known about conspiracies. The Manhattan Project involved over 100,000 workers, of whom a 1945 Life article estimated that the compartmentalisation was such that before the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings "probably no more than a few dozen men in the entire country knew the full meaning of the Manhattan Project, and perhaps only a thousand others even were aware that work on atoms was involved." The magazine wrote that over 100,000 others employed on the project "worked like moles in the dark".[21][22] If Life is to be believed, the assumption that all personnel are equally informed would appear in this case to out by 4-5 orders of magnitude, directly contradicting Grimes' finding that large conspiracies "quickly become untenable."[19]

Instant exposure

The televised confession by Loyd Jowers of involvement in the MLK assassination

The paper ignores the fact that corporate media is controlled, assuming that any conspirator could instantly expose a conspiracy. This ignores historical evidence to the contrary such as, for example, the televised 1993 confession of Loyd Jowers that he was involved in the assassination of Martin Luther King. Not only do a large proportion of the US public remain ignorant of this fact, but the FBI showed no interest in his testimony, even after the 1999 civil trial in which a jury unanimously found that Jowers and agents of the US government were involved in his killing.[23]

1985|


References

  1. a b https://pieceofmindful.com/2016/10/24/too-many-people-on-the-viability-of-conspiratorial-beliefs/
  2. "David Robert Grimes", theguardian.com. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  3. "David Robert Grimes", irishtimes.com. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  4. Document:Elites Link Anti-Government Thought to Mental Illness
  5. https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/anti-fluoride-lobby-can-t-get-its-teeth-into-the-truth-1.1520290
  6. https://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2014/apr/04/politicians-anti-fluoridation-campaigners-fluoride-water
  7. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/feb/05/denying-climate-change-scepticism-motivated-reasoning
  8. https://www.irishtimes.com/news/environment/climate-change-is-real-ignore-the-denialists-1.1570833
  9. https://health.spectator.co.uk/the-rise-of-the-cannabis-cult-dont-believe-the-hype-about-medical-marijuana/
  10. https://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2017/jan/24/cancer-treatment-myths-clean-eating-cannabis-homeopathy-alternative
  11. http://senseaboutscience.org/activities/2014-john-maddox-prize/
  12. https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/anti-hpv-vaccine-myths-have-fatal-consequences-1.3213118
  13. https://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2016/jan/11/why-is-there-opposition-hpv-vaccine-cervical-cancer
  14. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/16/disgraced-antimmr-vaccine-doctor-andrew-wakefield-gets-invitation/
  15. https://www.theguardian.com/science/blog/2016/feb/17/electromagnetic-radiation-doesnt-make-you-ill-or-give-you-cancer-heres-why
  16. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/jul/21/mobile-phones-are-not-a-health-hazard
  17. https://peerj.com/preprints/3355/
  18. https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/anti-quack-law-to-stop-peddling-of-fake-cancer-treatments-xh3fnk0s6
  19. a b "On the Viability of Conspiratorial Beliefs"
  20. http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35411684
  21. Wickware, Francis Sill (20 August 1945). "Manhattan Project: Its Scientists Have Harnessed Nature's Basic Force". Life. p. 91. Retrieved 25 November 2011.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  22. "The Secret City / Calutron operators at their panels, in the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during World War II". The Atlantic. 25 June 2012. Retrieved 25 June 2012.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  23. https://www.muckrock.com/news/archives/2017/apr/04/fbi-mlk-jowers/