Harry Reid

From Wikispooks
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Person.png Harry Reid   WebsiteRdf-icon.png
BornHarry Mason Reid
1939-12-02
Searchlight, Nevada, U.S.
Alma materSouthern Utah University, Utah State University
ReligionThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Children • Lana
• Rory
• Leif Josh
• Key
SpouseLandra Gould
PartyDemocratic

Employment.png Senate Minority Leader

In office
January 3, 2015 - January 3, 2017
Succeeded byCharles Schumer

Employment.png Senate Minority Leader

In office
January 3, 2005 - January 3, 2007
Preceded byTom Daschle

Employment.png United States Senator from Nevada

In office
January 3, 1987 Serving with Dean Heller - January 3, 2017
Preceded byPaul Laxalt, Harry Reid"strong class="error">Error: Invalid time." contains an extrinsic dash or other characters that are invalid for a date interpretation.Paul Laxalt

Employment.png Senate Majority Leader

In office
January 3, 2007 - January 3, 2015

Employment.png Senate Minority Whip

In office
January 3, 2003 - January 3, 2005

Employment.png Senate Minority Whip

In office
January 20, 2001 - June 6, 2001

Employment.png Senate Minority Whip

In office
January 3, 1999 - January 3, 2001

Employment.png Senate Majority Whip

In office
June 6, 2001 - January 3, 2003

Employment.png Senate Majority Whip

In office
January 3, 2001 - January 20, 2001

Employment.png Lieutenant Governor of Nevada

In office
January 4, 1971 - January 5, 1975

Employment.png Chair of the Nevada Gaming Commission

In office
March 27, 1977 - January 5, 1981

Gun control

Citing mass shootings, Harry Reid was "pushing for a vote on gun-control measures, including expanded background checks".[1]

2 December 1939| 

Legal Case

NamePlaintiff(s)Defendant(s)StartEndDescription
Hedges v. ObamaDaniel Ellsberg
Chris Hedges
Noam Chomsky
Jenifer Bolen
Kai Wargalla
Birgitta Jónsdóttir
Alexa O'Brien
Barack Obama
Leon Panetta
John McCain
John Boehner
Harry Reid
Nancy Pellosi
Eric Cantor
John Michael McConnell
US Department of Defense
United States of America
13 January 201228 April 2014The plaintiffs challenged the 2012 NDAA contending that indefinite detention on "suspicion of providing substantial support" to groups such as al-Qaeda and the Taliban was so vague as to allow unconstitutional, indefininte detention of civilians based on vague allegations. The Court of Appeals struck down an initial agreement, and the US Supreme Court concurred, arguning that the plaintiffs could not prove they would be affected by the law, so had no standing to contest it.


References


57px-Notepad icon.png This is a page stub. Please add to it.