Reuters

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Group.png Reuters  
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Reuters.png
HeadquartersCanary Wharf, London, England, U.K.
Member ofAtlantic Council/Corporate Members, Council on Foreign Relations/Corporate Members, World Economic Forum/Strategic Partners
SubpageReuters/CEO
Reuters/Chairman
Reuters/Director

Reuters is a global news agency. Previously British, it is now owned by the Canadian company Thomson-Reuters. Together with two other agencies, Agence France-Presse and Associated Press, it provides up to 90% of all contents in all corporate media in the entire world. Reuters alone publishes 3 million stories every year[1].

History

The British government secretly funded Reuters in the 1960s and 1970s at the behest of Information Research Department (IRD), the British government's anti-Soviet propaganda unit linked to British intelligence. The source of the funding was concealed by using the BBC as a conduit to make the payments.

The secret government financing of Reuters amounted to 245,000 pounds ($317,838 at 2020 exchange rates) per year before 1969 but then reduced to 100,000 pounds per year in 1969-1970.

“The new relationship established with Reuters in the Middle East and Latin America can lead to valuable goodwill and cooperation with the Agency on a global scale,” John Peck, former head of the IRD, said in declassified government documents.[2]

Leadership

  • James C. Smith, CEO of the world's biggest news agency, Thomson Reuters, is on the board of Atlantic Council, the most central military-industrial/NATO think-tank. Thomson Reuters consistently promotes a very strong pro-US/NATO line in geopolitical questions. He is also on the board of Pfizer.[3]
  • The Canadian politician Chrystia Freeland, who the The US State Department boasted had adopted an “America first” foreign policy, in 2010 became "global editor-at-large of Reuters, the biggest international news agency, that is the source of most foreign policy stories for the entire mainstream media."
  • Dawn Scalici joined Thomson Reuters in July 2015 to serve as the company’s first Government Global Business Director, where she "develops strategic relationships with government sector constituents and key decision-makers, develops campaigns to promote Thomson Reuters’ business growth, and works with the company’s senior executives to determine relevant strategic goals and plans."..." Prior to joining Thomson Reuters, Scalici served 33 years with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).[4]
  • Natalie Runyon, the Director of Enterprise Content for Talent, Inclusion and Culture "has more than 20 years of experience working and volunteering for multinational organizations, including Thomson Reuters, Goldman Sachs, and the Central Intelligence Agency." Her current job has a hand in the company's recruitment and promotion process, nominally to include women and minorities.

Reporting

In 2016, Reuters featured Simon Bracey-Lane (later of the Institute for Statecraft) on their website[5].

Simon Bracey-Lane working for Bernie Sanders.jpg

Thomson Reuters Special Services

Reuters also runs a private intelligence service, with commercial ties to governments and national intelligence services. The president of the company,Timothy P. Murphy, was previously the FBI's Deputy Director and worked for the Bureau from 1988 until 2011, and the board is full of deep state operators. The Thomson Reuters Special Services (TRSS) provides "research and actionable insights for national security missions." Many of the people TRSS employs comes "from academia, law enforcement, and defense and intelligence agencies"... "the same organizations as the clients we serve".[6] After the Integrity Initiative (II) was exposed, one of the members, Maria de Goeij, moved over to TRSS. Some of the TRSS commercial services points to similar work as the II, (witch hunts and psychological operations) with the claim to be able to "uncover foreign influence in sensitive and vulnerable environments" in support of "action-based missions",[7] presumably giving governments plausible deniability for dirty operations.

In 2018 the company successfully bid to assist the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in the “arrest, detention, and removal of criminal aliens from the United States”. ICE required technical capability to “track 500,000 identities per month”. [8] With help from another Reuters subsidiary, West Publishing, TRSS provides ICE’s “Detention Compliance and Removals” office with access to a massive license plate scanning database, along with agency access to the Consolidated Lead Evaluation and Reporting (CLEAR) system, which Reuters advertises as holding a “vast collection of public and proprietary records.”[9]

This intelligence work is also provided globally, through TRSS International Limited (TRSSI), a London-based wholly-owned subsidiary of Thomson Reuters Special Services LLC, which mentions "working side-by-side with government agencies".[10]


 

A Quote by Reuters

PageQuoteDateSource
John McCain“Republican 2008 presidential hopeful John McCain crooned the words “Bomb Iran” to a Beach Boys’ tune in joking response to a question about any possible U.S. attack over Tehran’s suspected nuclear weapons program. “That old Beach Boys song, Bomb Iran ... bomb, bomb, bomb, bomb,” the Vietnam War veteran warbled softly to the band’s “Barbara Ann” when he was asked when the United States would send an “airmail message” to Iran.”April 2007YouTube

 

Related Quotation

PageQuoteAuthorDate
John Laughland“People experience a strong psychological reluctance to accept that political events today are deliberately manipulated. This reluctance is itself a product of the ideology of the information age, which flatters people’s vanity and encourages them to believe that they have access to huge amounts of information. In fact, the apparent multifarious nature of modern media information hides an extreme paucity of original sources, rather as a street of restaurants on a Greek waterfront can hide the reality of a single kitchen at the back. News reports of major events very often come from a single source, usually a wire agency, and even authoritative news outlets like the BBC simply recycle information which they have received from these agencies, presenting it as their own.”John Laughland2010

 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:The Propaganda Multipliermedia analysis2016Swiss Propaganda Research
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