Lyndon Johnson

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Person.png Lyndon Johnson   History Commons IMDB Sourcewatch SpartacusRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(Teacher, Politician, deep state functionary, psychopath)
Lyndon B. Johnson.jpg
BornLyndon Baines Johnson
1908-08-27
Stonewall, Texas, U.S.
Died1973-01-22 (Age 64)
near Stonewall, Texas, U.S.
Alma materTexas State University
ReligionReformed
Children • Lynda Bird
• Luci Baines
SpouseLady Bird Taylor
Founder ofThe Warren Commission
Member ofJFK/Assassination/Perpetrators, US/Deep state
PartyDemocratic
SubpageLyndon Johnson/Appoints Hoover as FBI Director
Generally agreed to have been heavily involved in the plot to assassinate his predecessor, JFK.

Employment.png US President

In office
November 22, 1963 - January 20, 1969
EmployerUS Government
An ambitious psychopath who is generally agreed to have played a significant or possibly leading role in organising the assassination of JFK. He established the Warren Commission to cover up the JFK assassination. He reversed JFK's decision to reduce troop numbers in Vietnam and instead escalated the war.

Employment.png US Vice President

In office
January 20, 1961 - November 22, 1963
EmployerUS Government
Suspected to have blackmailed his way into the vice presidency so he could become president when JFK was assassinated.

Employment.png Senate Majority Leader

In office
January 3, 1955 - January 3, 1961

Employment.png Senate Minority Leader

In office
January 3, 1953 - January 3, 1955

Employment.png Senate Majority Whip

In office
January 3, 1951 - January 3, 1953

Employment.png United States Senator from Texas

In office
January 3, 1949 - January 3, 1961

Lyndon Baines Johnson was a politician who became US President after the JFK Assassination. He put together the Warren Commission charged with investigating the assassination. Through his entire career, Johnson was the man of the Suite 8F Group, a deep state faction of Texas businessmen.

JFK Assassination

Full article: John F. Kennedy/Assassination
LBJ insists upon being sworn in just hours after the JFK assassination.

The 36th President of the United States (1963–1969), Lyndon Johnson is generally reckoned to have been the deeply involved with the JFK Assassination, and was named as such by the deathbed confession of CIA agent E. Howard Hunt.

President Kennedy was reluctant to choose LBJ as his vice president, but felt forced to select him as vice president.

Mark Gorton alleges that LBJ "had his own personal hit man, Mac Wallace, who had been killing people for a decade to keep LBJ’s crimes from being exposed."[1]

Madeleine Duncan Brown's testimony

Lyndon Johnson's had a longtime mistress Madeleine Duncan Brown. She named LBJ as a key organiser of the JFK assassination[2][3], although her testimony is doubted by some, including JFK researcher Joan Mellen, who has stated that her evidence is unreliable and deceitful.[4]

Vietnam War

Full article: Vietnam War

LBJ stoked war fever by characterizing North Vietnam’s attacks on the Maddox – and the later attack on the Maddox and the Turner Joy – as "unprovoked aggression." A very different picture is revealed by a phone conversation he had on August 3 with his Treasury Secretary Robert Anderson, which the latter secretly recorded:

"OK. Here’s what we did. We [were] within their 12-mile limit, and that’s a matter that hasn’t been settled. But there have been some covert operations in that area that we have been carrying on – blowing up some bridges and things of that kind, roads, and so forth. So I imagine they wanted to put a stop to it. So they come out there and fire and we respond immediately with five-inch guns from the destroyer and with planes overhead. And we cripple them up – knock one of them out and cripple the other two. And then we go right back where we were with that destroyer [the Maddox], and with another one [the Turner Joy], plus plenty of planes standing by. And that’s where we are now."
LBJ - 1964-08-03[5]

William Pepper quotes Colonel John Downey, LBJ's briefing officer during the Vietnam War as stating that LBJ stated that he couldn't stop the war in Vietnam because "my friends are making too much money".[6]

Vulgar Manners

LBJ he used crass behavior to bend people to his will. At 6-ft., 3-in. tall and 210 lbs., he liked to lean over people, spitting, swearing, belching, or laughing in their faces. His favorite power ploy was dragging people into the bathroom with him—forcing them to continue their conversations with the president as he used the toilet.[7]

Seymour Hersh, in his memoir Reporter tells an anecdote from one of Hersh’s older colleagues, Tom Wicker. He recounted the reaction of LBJ to a highly critical story about Vietnam he wrote in late 1965, when the war was still highly popular with the American public. Right after it was published, Wicker was at LBJ’s Texas ranch with a bunch of other reporters when the whole press corps was told to be at a remote spot at a certain time.

Right after they arrived, a big Lincoln convertible came screaming up to them at top speed. The driver–Johnson–slammed the car to a halt and yelled for Wicker to climb in. "Tom got into the car and the two of them sped off down a dusty dirt road. No words were spoken. After a moment or two, Johnson once again slammed on the brakes, wheeling to a halt near a stand of trees. Leaving the motor running, he climbed out, walked a few dozen feet toward the trees, stopped, pulled down his pants, and defecated, in full view. The President wiped himself with leaves and grass, pulled up his pants, climbed into the car, turned in around, and sped back to the press gathering. Once there, again the brakes were slammed on, and Tom was motioned out. All of this was done without a word being spoken."[8]


 

A Quote by Lyndon Johnson

PageQuoteDateSource
Gulf of Tonkin Incident“OK. Here’s what we did. We [were] within their 12-mile limit, and that’s a matter that hasn’t been settled. But there have been some covert operations in that area that we have been carrying on – blowing up some bridges and things of that kind, roads, and so forth. So I imagine they wanted to put a stop to it. So they come out there and fire and we respond immediately with five-inch guns from the destroyer and with planes overhead. And we cripple them up – knock one of them out and cripple the other two. And then we go right back where we were with that destroyer [the Maddox], and with another one [the Turner Joy], plus plenty of planes standing by. And that’s where we are now.”3 August 1964Nuclear Risk

 

An appointment by Lyndon Johnson

AppointeeJobAppointedEnd
John H. ReedNational Transportation Safety Board/Chairman19661976

 

Related Quotation

PageQuoteAuthorDate
Freedom of Information Act“It appears that Freedom of Information (hereinafter FOI) laws have never been loved by their parents. When US President Lyndon Johnson signed the world's first FOI Act into law in 1966, he was so keen not to be associated with it that – uniquely among modern Presidential enactions – there was no photographer present to capture the historic moment. It is fitting that Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair, who gave the UK its own FOI Act, has since attempted to disassociate himself from the law he presented to the Queen for Royal Assent in 2000.”Garrick Alder2017


References