Alleged Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections

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Event.png Alleged Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections  Rdf-icon.png
Shady putin.jpg
Date2016

The Russian government allegedly interfered in the 2016 United States presidential election in order to increase political instability in the United States and to damage Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign by bolstering the candidacies of Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders and Jill Stein.[1][2] A January 2017 assessment by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) stated that Russian leadership favoured presidential candidate Trump over Clinton, and that Russian president Vladimir Putin personally ordered an "influence campaign" to harm Clinton's chances and "undermine public faith in the US democratic process".

On 7 October 2016, the ODNI and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) jointly stated that the US Intelligence Community was confident that the Russian Government directed recent hacking of emails with the intention of interfering with the US election process.[3] According to the ODNI's report on 6 January 2017, the Main Intelligence Directorate had hacked the servers of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and the personal Google email account of Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta and forwarded their contents to WikiLeaks.[4][5] Although Russian officials have repeatedly denied involvement in any DNC hacks or leaks, there is strong forensic evidence linking the DNC breach to known Russian operations.[6] In January 2017, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testified that Russia also interfered in the elections by disseminating fake news promoted on social media.[7] On 13 July 2018, 12 Russian military intelligence agents were indicted by Special Counsel Robert Mueller for allegedly hacking the email accounts and networks of Democratic Party officials.[8]

On 31 October 2016, President Barack Obama warned Vladimir Putin via the "red phone" to stop interfering or face consequences.[9] In December 2016, Obama ordered a report on hacking efforts aimed at US elections since 2008, while US Senators called for a bipartisan investigation. President-elect Trump rejected claims of foreign interference and said that Democrats were reacting to their election loss. On 29 December 2016, the Obama Administration expelled 35 Russian diplomats, denied access to two Russia-owned compounds, and broadened existing sanctions on Russian entities and individuals. More sanctions were imposed against Russia by the Trump administration in March 2018,[10][11] and on 6 April 2018, the Trump administration brought another new round of sanctions against Russia, targeting several oligarchs and high-ranking Russian officials.[12][13] In June 2018, the United States Department of the Treasury implemented new sanctions on several Russian entities and officials in connection to cyberattacks by Russia related to the 2016 election interference.[14] Several countries in the European Union have also pursued a sanctions regime against Russia, accusing the state of supporting terrorism and interfering in their own elections.[15]

Investigations about Russian influence on the election include a counter-intelligence investigation by the FBI, hearings by the Senate Intelligence Committee and the House Intelligence Committee, and inquiries about possible links and financial ties between the Kremlin and Trump associates, notably targeting Paul Manafort, Carter Page and Roger Stone.[16] On May 9, 2017, Trump dismissed FBI Director James Comey,[17] citing in part dissatisfaction with suspicions of his presidency because of "this Russia thing".[18][19] On 17 May, Deputy Attorney General, and Acting Attorney General for this investigation Rod Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as Special Counsel to oversee the investigation.[20]

In a testimony on 13 February 2018, before the Senate Intelligence Committee, the heads of the top six American intelligence agencies unanimously reaffirmed Russian interference. Three sources familiar with Trump's thinking told CNN he remains unconvinced that Russia interfered because it suggests he did not win the election solely on his own merits.[21]

As of June 2018, at least 11 Trump associates or officials have admitted to having contacts with Russians during the campaign or transition.[22]

 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:Mueller Scrambles To Limit Evidence After Indicted Russians Actually Show Up In CourtArticle13 June 2018'Tyler Durden'This is probably the first time in the history of litigation that a plaintiff (here, prosecutor) has told a court that it may not have obtained good service of process on a defendant that has appeared to defend the case on the merits. Robert Mueller to US District Court: "We didn’t really mean it, Judge! We had no idea they might actually show up!"


References

  1. Shane, Scott; Mazzetti, Mark (16 February 2018). "Inside a 3-Year Russian Campaign to Influence U.S. Voters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 17 February 2018.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  2. Feldman, Brian (January 6, 2017). "DNI Report: High Confidence Russia Interfered With U.S. Election". nymag.com. Retrieved October 6, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  3. "Joint Statement from the Department Of Homeland Security and Office of the Director of National Intelligence on Election Security". Department of Homeland Security. October 7, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  4. Franceschi-Bicchierai, Lorenzo (October 20, 2016). "New evidence proves Russian hackers were behind the hack on Podesta, connecting the dots on different parts of the complex hacking campaign". vice.com. Retrieved July 9, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  5. "Cyber researchers confirm Russian government hack of Democratic National Committee". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 26, 2016.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  6. Rid, Thomas (July 24, 2016). "All Signs Point to Russia Being Behind the DNC Hack". Motherboard. Retrieved December 23, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  7. "Top U.S. intelligence official: Russia meddled in election by hacking, spreading of propaganda". The Washington Post. January 5, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  8. "12 Russians indicted in Mueller investigation"
  9. Arkin, William M.; Dilanian, Ken; McFadden, Cynthia (December 19, 2016). "What Obama Said to Putin on the Red Phone About the Election Hack". NBC News. Retrieved December 22, 2016.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  10. Liptak, Kevin (15 March 2018). "Trump administration finally announces Russia sanctions over election meddling". CNN.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  11. Lee, Carol E.; Sonne, Paul (December 30, 2016). "U.S. Sanctions Russia Over Election Hacking; Moscow Threatens to Retaliate". The Wall Street Journal.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  12. "Trump Administration Imposes New Sanctions on Putin Cronies". New York Times. 6 April 2018. Retrieved 6 April 2018.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  13. "US imposes sanctions against Russian oligarchs and government officials". CNN. 6 April 2018. Retrieved 6 April 2018.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  14. "US unveils new Russia sanctions over cyberattacks". CNN. 11 June 2018.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  15. "Ukraine, three other countries align with EU Council's sanctions decision following Putin's "elections" in occupied Crimea". Unian. 12 June 2018.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  16. Aleem, Zeesham (January 21, 2017). "6 different agencies have come together to investigate Trump's possible Russia ties". Vox. Retrieved March 15, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  17. Roberts, Rachel (May 11, 2017). "Donald Trump fired James Comey because 'he refused to end Russia investigation', say multiple FBI insiders". The Independent. Retrieved May 11, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  18. "James Comey, Donald Trump and the Russia Investigation: A Timeline of Events" NBC News (June 7, 2017): "When I decided to [fire Comey], I said to myself, I said you know, this Russia thing with Trump and Russia is a made up story."
  19. Smith, Allan (June 7, 2017). "Comey told Trump 3 times that he wasn't under investigation, but his refusal to publicly say so infuriated Trump". Business Insider. Retrieved June 10, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  20. Levine, Mike; Kelsey, Adam (May 17, 2017). "Robert Mueller appointed special counsel to oversee probe into Russia's interference in 2016 election". ABC News. Retrieved May 17, 2017.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  21. Sara Murray and Jeremy Herb. "Trump still unconvinced Russia meddled in 2016 election". CNN. Retrieved February 28, 2018.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  22. Thomsen, Jacqueline (June 17, 2018). "Roger Stone: Russian wanted Trump to pay $2M for dirt on Clinton during the campaign". thehill.com. Retrieved June 19, 2018.Page Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
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