Syracuse University

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Group.png Syracuse University  
(UniversityHistory Commons WebsiteRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Syracuse University seal.png
MottoSuos Cultores Scientia Coronat
(Latin)
Formation1870
HeadquartersNew York State, USA
TypePrivate research university
Other nameOrange
Crouse College, a Romanesque building completed in 1889, housed the first College of Fine Arts in the U.S. It is now the home of the College of Visual and Performing Arts and the Setnor School of Music.

Syracuse University is a private research university in Syracuse, New York. The institution's roots can be traced to the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, founded in 1831 by the Methodist Episcopal Church in Lima, New York. After several years of debate over relocating the college to Syracuse, the university was established in 1870, independent of the college. Since 1920, the university has identified itself as nonsectarian, although it maintains a relationship with The United Methodist Church.

The campus is in the University Hill neighborhood of Syracuse, east and southeast of downtown, on one of the larger hills. Its large campus features an eclectic mix of buildings, ranging from nineteenth-century Romanesque Revival structures to contemporary buildings. SU is organized into 13 schools and colleges, with nationally recognized programs in information studies and library science, architecture, communications, business administration, inclusive education and wellness, sport management, public administration, engineering and the College of Arts and Sciences. Alumni and affiliates include 3 Nobel Prize laureates, 1 Fields Medalist, 33 Olympic Medalists, numerous Pulitzer Prize recipients, Academy Award winners, Rhodes Scholars, Marshall Scholars, President of the United States Joe Biden, and various governors and members of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives.


Modern

After World War II, Syracuse University began to transform into a major research institution. Enrollment increased in the four years after the war due to the G.I. Bill, which paid tuition, room, board, and a small allowance for veterans returning from World War II. In 1946, SU admitted 9,464 freshmen, nearly four times greater than the previous incoming class. Branch campuses were established in Endicott, New York, and Utica, New York, which became Binghamton University and Utica College respectively.

The velocity with which the university sped through its change into a major research institution was astounding. By the end of the 1950s, Syracuse ranked twelfth nationally in terms of the amount of its sponsored research, and it had over four hundred professors and graduate students engaging in that investigation.

From the early 1950s through the 1960s, Syracuse University added programs and staff that continued the transformation of the school into a research university. In 1954, Arthur Phillips was recruited from MIT and started the first pathogen-free animal research laboratory. The lab focused on studying medical problems using animal models. The School of Social Work, which eventually merged into the College of Human Ecology, was founded in 1956. Syracuse's College of Engineering also founded the nation's second oldest computer engineering and bioengineering programs. In 1962, Samuel Irving Newhouse Sr. donated $15 million to begin construction of a school of communications, eventually known as the SI Newhouse School of Public Communications. In 1966, Syracuse University was admitted to the Association of American Universities, an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education.

Benefactors

Syracuse has had many financial supporters, but some stand out by the magnitude of their contributions. Among those who have made transformative donations commemorated at the university are:

Notable alumni

Education

Investors, industrialists, and executives

Hospitality, real estate, construction, and architecture

Law and Government

Media and communications

Science, engineering, innovation, medicine, and exploration


Entertainment and performing arts

Other

Arts and letters


 

Alumni on Wikispooks

PersonBornDiedNationalitySummaryDescription
Milton AllimadiUgandaJournalist
Editor
Founder/editor of Black Star News, which broke the news of Sunny Sheu's murder.
John R. Bass1964
Ernest Becker27 September 19246 March 1974USAnthropologist
Joe Biden20 November 1942USDeep state actor
Willy De Clercq8 July 192728 October 2011
James B. Cunningham1952Diplomat
Daniel A. D'Aniello14 September 1946
Üstün Ergüder1935TurkeyAcademicRector of Bosporus University, Board Member of the Vehbi Koç Foundation
Hidipo Hamutenya17 June 19396 October 2016Politician
Kathy Hochul27 August 195827 August 1958USPolitician
Megyn Kelly18 November 1970USJournalistFamous American journalist.
Mark Lombardi23 March 195122 March 2000USArtistUS artist who became interested in graphing deep state networks
Roula Khalaf RazzoukMay 1965Lebanon
UK
EditorFT Editor alleged to be complicit in faking evidence to promote the Skripal affair official narrative
Mitchell Rogovin3 December 19307 February 1996USLawyerSpecial counsel to the Central Intelligence Agency in 1975 and 1976.
Warren Rudman18 May 193019 November 2012Politician
Lawyer
A Rockefeller Republican Senator and possible deep state functionality
Craig Spence194110 November 1989USJournalist
Lobbyist
Franklin child prostitution ring/Premature death
Deep state actor
Blackmailer?
A lobbyist who ran a call-boy ring for purposes of sexual blackmail, also implicated in the Franklin child prostitution ring. Died suddenly.
Christine Varney17 December 1955USLawyer


References